Images of the Border Crises Speak Louder Than ‘Womp Womp’

Images of the Border Crises Speak Louder Than 'Womp Womp'

Image Photos, video and audio of immigrant families being separated at the border havestimulated international outrage.Credit John Moore/Getty Images We now understand the sound it makes when human decency passes away on live cable news: That was the

noise that the former Trump campaign supervisor Corey Lewandowski made Tuesday night throughout a Fox News section on the Trump administration policy of separating immigrant moms and dads from their kids at the border. He made it when a Democratic strategist, Zac Petkanas, informed the story of a 10-year-old woman with Down syndrome who was drawn from her mom in Texas.Corey Lewandowski Says'Womp, Womp 'About Lady With Down Syndrome Credit Video by vgolfoz Womp womp.

you canrely on to ridicule and revile the president's enemies or perceived enemies.This time, the enemy was a handicapped woman.

is already political, particularly when that White Home sees electoral advantage in it. The "politicizing," apparently, comes when you ask the audience to feel bad about it.Mr.

Lewandowski might have been egregious, however he hasn't been alone on Fox. Laura Ingraham tried the buffooning someone with a special needs). The method is a particular favorite of Fox opinion hosts. Tucker Carlson has practically developed a show on it.But the sights and sounds of the previous couple of days have been too awful to sneer

away. The Trump administration's border policy had actually remained in place for weeks. Just in the past week or so did we get the images, video and terrible audio that push a story to the front of the news and keep it there.There was the wailing 2-year-old in the dark, barely higher than the knees of the border representative patting down her mom. The kids behind chain-link fences and huddled under foil blankets. The cartoon Trump looming at a children's detention center(among numerous illustrations of presidents),) beside a quote about a real-estate battle from"The Art of the Offer."Many horrific were the pictures we could only envision, hearing the audio from a detention center acquired by ProPublica: 10 Main American kids pleading, bargaining, groaning inconsolably for their parents.There was a sense, by Tuesday, ofboth anger and anguish coming to a head. Kirstjen Nielsen, the secretary of homeland security, was

captured on social networks video while< a href =https://www.npr.org/2018/06/20/621875523/shame-protesters-shout-at-dhs-head-kirstjen-nielsen-eating-at-mexican-restaurant title target=_ blank > protesters shouted"Shame!"at her as she attempted to dine out.(She was at a Mexican dining establishment, the sort of real-life detail a TV manufacturer would decline from a screenwriter as too on-the-nose. )Which night, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow directed the emotion of much of her audience, breaking down in tears as she attempted to get through

a news flash: that infants and toddlers were being warehoused in"childhood "facilities after being drawn from their parents.Maybe Mr. Lewandowski would womp-womp her reaction. Likely, he 'd say that Ms. Maddow was politicizing the news. And look: Ms. Maddow does not precisely conceal that she's political.

Many of the critics of Mr. Trump's detentions want to advance their own agendas.But that doesn't make her tears less real. I understand my own were genuine. There is an instinctual action to hearing kids wailing for their moms and dads. You wish to protect, defend, convenience, make the problem disappear. The feeling is human. And yes,

it is possibly politically effective. It's not prejudiced, except that it's exactly what predispositions us toward the perpetuation of the types."Womp womp"is the noise of somebody informing you that this standard decency is questionable, weak, a trick, something to be mastered for the sake of the team. It's the music of someone aiming to provide you permission to solidify your heart to strangers while still thinking about yourself

as an excellent person.It's the hit tune of our weary time, as well as after this week, I do not imagine it will disappear from cable-news and online arguments. But possibly the next time we hear that trombone, it will sound a little less unfortunate, and a little bit more pathetic.A variation of this post appears in print on, on Page A13 of the New york city edition

with the heading: Sounds From Border May Echo Longer Than Empty Trolling

Source

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/20/arts/television/border-crisis-womp-womp.html