Macon County couple 5 years in as first generation farmers

In addition to their row crops, Beth and Josh also sell pickles, peppers and jams which account for about 60 percent of their business, all home grown. (Source: Pixabay) In addition to their row crops, Beth and Josh also sell pickles, peppers and jams which account for about 60 percent of their organisation, all house grown. (Source: Pixabay)

7 days a week and a minimum of nine hours a day, Beth has braved the heat, the cold and the bugs to make it a go. (Source: WSFA 12 News) MACON COUNTY, AL (WSFA) - Beth Hornsby remembers about 5 years earlier when her other half, Josh, thought it was time to try something new, despite an excellent paying task with good insurance."I thought he was crazy,"she said.Not anymore. Welcome to Hornsby's Farm in Macon County."We've gained a lot of valuable time with our children, so we didn't quit anything, "said Hornsby.The 300 acres Josh Hornsby inherited are covered with squash, okra,

corn therefore a lot more. The Hornsbys are first generation farmers, something we're seeing nationwide." Got someone next week thinking about beginning a farm so we'll reveal them how it works, "said Hornsby.Seven days a week and a minimum of 9 hours a day, Beth has actually braved the heat, the cold and the bugs to make it a go. And along the method, she's found out a couple of lessons that continue to take root and grow.

"Trust your instincts. If a plant is refraining from doing too well, do not aim to push it," she said.In addition to their row crops, Beth and Josh likewise offer pickles, peppers and jams which account for about 60 percent of their organisation, all home grown.

"Dining establishments truly like to have that element to connect their consumer with the local farmer," Hornsby said.The Hornsbys are 5 years into their brand-new endeavor and so far no regrets. Their leap of faith is paying off. Whatever that's grown here serves six restaurants in the Auburn location. "We 're pulling it and within an hour we deliver it to the dining establishment," she said.Beth Hornsby knew going in this manner of making ends fulfill was not for the faint of heart. It's hard."Any day is various,"she said.With her wagon full of squash, Beth Hornsey hasn't looked back.

Living the dream, on the farm.

Source

http://wsfa.com/story/38558687/macon-county-couple-5-years-in-as-first-generation-farmers